How to Detect Fake Honey (It’s Everywhere). Use This Simple Trick!

Did you know that there is real honey and fake honey? What is Pure Honey? What is Fake, Impure or Adulterated Honey? Can you know the difference between fake and pure honey? Without knowing how to check the purity of honey, it will be difficult to tell and identify the difference. Here’s a guide what is pure honey and how to test the purity of honey.

If you want to enjoy most of the benefits derived from honey, its purity is what you should consider before buying. There are some simple tests and experiments that can be performed at home, to verify the purity of honey. Find out which tests you should try!

Most of the honey in the grocery stores isn’t exactly what the bees produce but fake and impure honey. Without distinguishing the difference between pure and fake honey, you will end up buying bad products. There are a lot of adulteration of honey, which makes it not real yet sold as the real thing. Because of the high demand for pure honey resulting from its medicinal and nutrient value individuals and companies have taken advantage of this (high demand) in a move to make an extra buck by selling fake honey.

What is real honey?

As you would expect, real honey should not come from a factory but from bees. The most common references to real and pure honey are organic and natural honey. By just looking packaged honey on the shelves, it is almost impossible to tell whether the honey is fake or real. Pure honey is the natural product made by honey bees.

How can you tell the difference?

By examining the physical qualities of honey, it is very easy to know whether this is pure or impure honey. We are looking at simple ways by which an average day to day consumer can quickly tell if the honey he/she buying is fake or pure. Below are some of the main differences in properties that will help you distinguish between the real and unreal thing. It is very easy to notice the impurities although this may require some practice first.

Conducting tests for purity of honey at home

Honey’s wonderful, delicious variety works against you when you’re trying to find a simple test. Different types of pure honey can cover a large range of density, flammability, and other characteristics. While the following tests are based on true principles, in practice your results may be inconclusive. Try several of these tests to see if the honey fails or passes consistently. In many cases, you can get nothing more than a good guess.

In order to check the purity of honey at home, here’s what to do:

Thumb Test
Here’s the procedure to do a thumb test:

  • Put a small drop of the honey you have on your thumb
  • Check to see if it spills or spreads around
  • If it does, it is not pure
  • Pure honey will stay intact on your thumb

The Water Test to Spot Fake Honey
Here’s how to do the water test:

  • Fill a glass with water
  • Add one tablespoon of honey into the glass
  • Adulterated or artificial honey will dissolve in water and you will see it around the glass
  • Pure honey, on the other hand, will settle right at the bottom of your glass

The Flame Test to Know Pure Honey
Did you know that organic honey is flammable? Here’s a test to know a 100% pure, organic honey.

  • Take a dry matchstick
  • Dip its tip right into the honey
  • Strike the stick on the matchbox as if to light it
  • If the honey is pure, the matchstick will light with ease
  • The flame will also keep burning off the honey
  • However, if it is with impurities, it will not light because fake honey contains moisture as one of the impurities

These are some of the simple and common ways to test pure honey at home. Another common method to tell the difference is as follows: add some water and 2-3 drops of vinegar essence into the honey and mix well. If the solution becomes foamy, that is definitely adulterated honey.

Drop honey on blotting paper or a paper towel
If honey has been diluted with water, it may be absorbed or leave a wet mark on an absorbent material such as blotting paper. Pure honey should not be absorbed, but unfortunately neither will honey diluted with most sugar syrups.

Interesting, don’t you think?



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